Breakouts, Workshops and Gallery of Good Practice Descriptions
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Breakouts and Workshops Sessions

1.1 - Exploring Success, Failure, and Resilience
Monday, 10.10.16 - 9:45am-11am

Description: How do our students make sense of their successes and of their failures? What does it mean to be resilient? Can resilience be learned/taught? This session explores the topics of success, failure, and resilience in the lives of our students and in our own lives. The session will provide opportunities for small-group discussion. No recording is allowed during this presentation.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. broaden/deepen their understanding of success, failure, and resilience, 2. reflect on the role of resilience in the lives of college/university scholarship students, and 3. explore how resilience is relevant to their work in the awarding of scholarships.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Small Groups - audience participation focusing on a central theme or topic. Presenter plays a role of a facilitator.

Presenter(s):

Adina Glickman, Stanford University
Adina Glickman is the Director of Student Learning Strategy Programs in the Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching Learning at Stanford University, and the Founding Director of the Stanford Resilience Project. With a background in social work, Adina has developed an academic skills coaching model that integrates traditional study skills instruction with counseling and advising techniques. Prior to coming to Stanford in 2001, Adina worked in community mental health and maintained a private therapy practice. She has presented workshops across the U.S. and in Japan and Turkey, and is a campus-wide resource for academic skills assessment and coaching.

Abigail Lipson, Harvard University
Abigail Lipson is the Director of the Bureau of Study Counsel at Harvard University, and co-founder of the multi-university Resilience Consortium. With a background in education and psychology, her interests include the practical, experiential, and neurocognitive aspects of the learning process; the relationships between motivation, achievement, and creativity; resilience in the face of failure and resilience in the face of success; how we make and remake decisions and cope with the consequences; and how college students’ senses of identity, family, culture, class, and life direction affect their college learning and evolve over time. She is a licensed clinical psychologist.

1.2- Private Foundations Learning Circle
Monday, 10.10.16 - 9:45am-11am

Description: The purpose of NSPA Learning Circles is to facilitate dialog and exchange of good practices among NSPA members who are working in similar organizations or have common interests and/or challenges. These groups will contribute to a body of knowledge ​for​ the wider NSPA community. Learning circles meet virtually as a group each quarter, and in person at the annual conference.

1.3 - Public Charities Learning Circle
Monday, 10.10.16 - 9:45am-11am
Description: The purpose of NSPA Learning Circles is to facilitate dialog and exchange of good practices among NSPA members who are working in similar organizations or have common interests and/or challenges. These groups will contribute to a body of knowledge ​for​ the wider NSPA community. Learning circles meet virtually as a group each quarter, and in person at the annual conference.

Format: Learning Circle

1.4 - Colleges and Universities Learning Circle
Monday, 10.10.16 - 9:45am-11am

Description: The purpose of NSPA Learning Circles is to facilitate dialog and exchange of good practices among NSPA members who are working in similar organizations or have common interests and/or challenges. These groups will contribute to a body of knowledge ​for​ the wider NSPA community. Learning circles meet virtually as a group each quarter, and in person at the annual conference.

Format: Learning Circle

1.5 - Community Foundations Learning Circle
Monday, 10.10.16 - 9:45am-11am

Description: The purpose of NSPA Learning Circles is to facilitate dialog and exchange of good practices among NSPA members who are working in similar organizations or have common interests and/or challenges. These groups will contribute to a body of knowledge ​for​ the wider NSPA community. Learning circles meet virtually as a group each quarter, and in person at the annual conference.

Format: Learning Circle

1.6 - Canadian Providers Learning Circle
Monday, 10.10.16 - 9:45am-11am

Description: The purpose of NSPA Learning Circles is to facilitate dialog and exchange of good practices among NSPA members who are working in similar organizations or have common interests and/or challenges. These groups will contribute to a body of knowledge ​for​ the wider NSPA community. Learning circles meet virtually as a group each quarter, and in person at the annual conference.

Format: Learning Circle

2.1 - Scholarship Practices from Basic to Best
Monday, 10.10.16 - 11:15am-12:30pm

Description: Are you achieving excellence in your scholarship program? Are you curious what other providers are doing? This three-part session consists of 1. a back-to-basics approach on scholarship program design using the NSPA toolkit as a resource, 2. an introduction to good or best practices based on what you are trying to accomplish, and 3. an open discussion and Q&A for scholarship providers to help each other. Participants will explore pressing issues, gain clarity on possible best practices, and discover strategies to enhance their success.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. receive an introduction to good or best practices, 2. explore hot topics, and 3. learn from other scholarship providers.

Track: Scholarship Program Basics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation. and Group Discussion

Presenter(s):

Kim Stezala, Stezala Consulting, LLC
Kimberly Stezala is President of Stezala Consulting, LLC, a company that assists scholarship providers, foundations and educational organizations to improve their vitality through objective analysis and consulting. Kim is focused on the strategy, evaluation, and improvement of programs with the overall goal of strengthening outcomes for youth and families in the college pipeline.

Students and parents know Kim as The Scholarship Lady,® through www.scholarshiplady.com and her book Scholarships 101: The Real-World Guide to Getting Cash for College.

She has been a guest speaker for the National Scholarship Providers Association for 10 years and was the content development consultant for the NSPA’s online toolkit for scholarship providers.

2.2 - Creating a Comprehensive Persistence Strategy for Student Success
Monday, 10.10.16 - 11:15am-12:30pm

Description: As a scholarship provider offering more than just money, we have researched some of the key reasons why our students drop out of college and are developing strategies for persistence, college completion and beyond. Come learn about our research and share ideas for formulating your own retention strategy.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. gain an understanding student risk indicators, 2. learn elements for developing a persistence strategy, and 3. share best practices.

Track: Scholarship Program Basics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Denise Callahan, The Ford Family Foundation
Denise Callahan joined the Foundation in 2012. She leads the Foundation's scholarship and postsecondary programs, focusing on strategic planning and developing long-term community relations and collaborations with partners. Denise came to the Foundation from her alma mater, Willamette University, in Salem, Oregon where she held several leadership positions focused on increasing the access, opportunities, experiences, and success of students and alumni at the institution. Denise grew up in northeastern Oregon, where her family still resides. Having spent the last half of their lives in the valley, she and her husband, John, enjoy traveling and exploring new venues for sightseeing, hiking and dining.

Tricia Tate, The Ford Family Foundation
Tricia Tate joined the Foundation in 2001. She manages daily operations and works with the Director to plan and refine program policies and procedures. She coordinates workflow to ensure seasonal deadlines are met and oversees annual payout of $11 million in scholarship disbursements. She graduated from the University of Oregon with a Bachelor of Arts in English and has a post-baccalaureate certificate from the University of San Diego. Outside of work, Tricia enjoys living in Eugene, hiking with her husband and border collie, reading, and travel.

Jeff Strickland, The Ford Family Foundation
Jeff Strickland joined the Foundation in 2013. He brought with him a unique set of skills in personal counseling, academic advising, and career guidance. In addition, he is an alumnus of the Ford ReStart Program (class of 2001). Jeff has served as a counselor in Medford and Ashland public schools, Oregon State University – Cascades, and Central Oregon Community College. Prior to his counseling career, he worked as a project manager, community liaison, and volunteer coordinator in affordable housing and commercial property development. Jeff holds a bachelor's degree in psychology, a master's degree in counseling, and certification with the National Board for Certified Counselors. Living most of his life in Southern Oregon, Jeff enjoys spending time outdoors hiking, fishing, canoeing and cross-country skiing. He lives in Eugene and has two grown daughters who reside in Oregon and South Carolina.

2.3 - S.H.I.F.T. Scholars Heading into the Future Together: Developing an Engaging and Meaningful Orientation Program
Monday, 10.10.16 - 11:15am-12:30pm

Description: You have selected your new class of scholarship recipients… now what? The Daniels Fund hosts an orientation program every June for their newly selected class of Daniels Scholars. The orientation program is entitled Scholars Heading into the Future Together (SHIFT). The goals of SHIFT for the newly selected class include that they understand what it means to be a Daniels Scholar, they learn about the founder Bill Daniels and the Daniels Fund, they build friendships and a support network, they are prepared for success in college and beyond, and they leave feeling INSPIRED!

The Daniels Fund will share their philosophy and best practices for an engaging orientation program that imparts your goals by diving into their own SHIFT program in this session.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. learn the mechanics of hosting an orientation program, 2. develop an engaging program that inspires scholarship recipients, 3. learn the Teach College 101 tips to your scholars, and 4. learn how to impart the values of your organization to your scholars effectively.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Laura Steffen, Daniels Fund
Laura Steffen is the Assistant Vice President of Scholar Recruitment and Selection at the Daniels Fund. She has been working in the Daniels Scholarship Program since November 2007 and overseeing the selection of Daniels Scholars since 2015. She is bilingual and uses her Spanish-speaking abilities to support Spanish-speaking families.

Prior to joining the Daniels Fund, Laura was a high school Spanish teacher, field hockey and lacrosse coach, and student advisor working at Kent Denver School and Fountain Valley School. She also served as the Director of the Latino Initiative at Junior Achievement of the Rockies. Laura currently represents the Daniels Fund on the National Scholarship Providers Association Board of Directors.

Having grown up in Salisbury, Maryland, Laura attended St. Andrew's School in Middletown, DE, earned her B.A. in English Literature from University of Oregon and her M.A. in Spanish Language and Literature from Middlebury College in Vermont.

Bill Fowler, Daniels Fund
Bill Fowler is the Senior Vice President of the Scholarship Program at the Daniels Fund. He joined the Daniels Fund in April 2012. He oversees all aspects of the Daniels Scholarship Program, including the community-based selection process, student support, employer and university relationships, scholar success programs, and scholar alumni relations. Bill also oversees the Boundless Opportunity Scholarship Program.

Prior to his position at the Daniels Fund, Bill served as Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer of Daniels & Associates, L.P., a privately owned media and telecommunications investment bank founded by Bill Daniels in 1958. Bill Fowler was responsible for the accounting, finance, treasury, human resources, information technology, and marketing functions of the firm.

Bill is a board member of Young Americans Bank and Education Foundation, and the NASBA Center for the Public Trust. He is a current board member and past board president of the Colorado Golf Association, and past board member and treasurer of the Jeffco Schools Foundation. Bill is a certified public accountant, and holds a bachelor’s degree in Accounting from Colorado State University.

2.4 - A Deep Dive into a Promise Scholarship Program
Monday, 10.10.16 - 11:15am-12:30pm

Description: Does the early promise of a scholarship improve high school performance, drive more students to attend college and complete a degree? That's the question The Degree Project seeks to answer. The first of its kind, The Degree Project is a randomized control trial of a promise scholarship conducted in collaboration with Milwaukee Public Schools. A single cohort of 2,588 Milwaukee Public Schools freshmen were given the promise in 2011 and these students have just completed their first year of college. This session will review what the researchers have learned to date and the implications these learnings may have on other scholarship programs.

Takeaways:  Attendees will take away lessons we learned as developing this promise scholarship. In addition, attendees will learn ideas to incorporate into their own scholarship programs, whether it is a promise scholarship or general scholarship.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Panel - presentation is lead primarily by a group of presenters with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Benjamin Dobner, Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation
Ben Dobner serves as a Director of Education Grantmaking at Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation. Through their philanthropy, Great Lakes works to increase college access, readiness, and success for students of all backgrounds. Ben has dedicated his career to this goal through his current role and through his experience as a financial aid director at both a two-year public and a four-year private college. Over the years, Ben has been actively involved at the state, local, and national level regarding college access and success, financial literacy, and financial aid administration.

2.5 - Getting to the Heart of It: Scholarship Programs and Practices for Adults
Monday, 10.10.16 - 11:15am-12:30pm

Description: The word “scholarship” is often associated with young adults ages 18 – 22. However, there is an ever growing population of adult students attending two or four year colleges, trade schools and programs who are seeking a better life for themselves and their families. Creating meaningful supports, acknowledging significant life experiences and advocating for collegiate considerations while providing wrap-around services brings significant challenges and rewards. Through lively simulation, case studies, innovative practices, and shared experiences a multifaceted approach to supporting adult scholarship recipients will be experienced rather than simply presented. Join us for this lively session as we consider both the uniqueness and similarities of adult scholarship providers and their scholars.

Takeaways:  This session will be an interactive simulation which gives the attendees the experience of being an adult learner. Participants will 1. gain a greater knowledge of the adult learner and the unique challenges he or she faces, 2. obtain a listing of wrap-around services currently provided to scholarship recipients, and 3. develop a list of questions crafted for use with the adult learner in mind.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - This will be more like a game - show format with questions, prizes, group and individual interaction and more!

Presenter(s):

Brenda Moran, STARS Scholarship Program, Council Bluffs Community Education Foundation
Brenda serves as the Program Director for the STARS Scholarship which supports low-income adult parents who are seeking a degree, license, or certificate. As a part educational advocate, part social worker, part cheerleader and part drill sergeant, she continues to find creative ways to motivate, congratulate and stimulate her scholars. She is a long-time champion of educational success with over 20 years of experience teaching, providing, and managing educational and service programs for all ages. With a Ph.D. in Children, Youth and Families from the University of Nebraska, a Master's in Ministry from Creighton University and a Bachelor's in Communications from the University of New Hampshire, she has first-hand experience as a traditional and an adult learner. Brenda and her husband Craig, live on a farm in Iowa and delight in their four grown children, a daughter and son-in-law and first granddaughter. For fun, she enjoys word games which helped her to become a contestant on Wheel of Fortune yet, alas, she couldn’t solve the bonus round puzzle!

April Greene, Jeannette Rankin Women's Scholarship Fund
April joined Jeannette Rankin Fund staff in 2009,after becoming the first in her family to earn a college degree. As Program and Operations Manager, she oversees the application and scholar selection process, develops JRF’s relationship with scholars, alumnae and applicants, and trains and coordinates scholarship review volunteers. In 2013, April launched JRF's first fully online scholarship application and review system and in 2014, she developed an Alumnae Advisory Board to harness alumnae's insights for improving JRF's program. The best part of April’s day is when she has a chance to speak with Jeannette Rankin scholars to offer encouragement or advice and learn about the amazing things they're accomplishing in school and their communities. April represents JRF in the National Scholarship Providers Association and recently accepted their 2014 Scholarship Provider of the Year Award on JRF's behalf. A University of Georgia alumna, April graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor's degree in Women’s Studies. She and her partner, Cameron, are proud parents to their daughter Asa and beagle pup Henry.

2.6 - Building Native Scholars: A Virtual Toolkit for Student Success
Monday, 10.10.16 - 11:15am-12:30pm

Description: To combat the low percentage of degree-holding American Indians nationwide, just 13% percent, the American Indian College Fund is creating a virtual platform to enhance holistic student success. This toolkit is designed to increase retention by complimenting the resources already available through student success initiatives at tribal colleges and universities (TCUs). This toolkit offers relevant information to Native scholars from high school through graduate school and includes topics such as time management, transition, and financial literacy. The breakout session will explore the development behind Native Scholars 101 and promote collaboration through sharing best practices and lessons learned throughout this process in order that participants may better promote success to Native scholars.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. explore new methods to disseminate student success resources for Native students, 2. promote collaboration between Tribal colleges, community members, and other stakeholders, and 3. share best practices of virtual resources to support student success.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Panel - presentation is lead primarily by a group of presenters with some audience participation., Given that this is a new initiative of our Student Success Services team, the presentation will be very interactive and participatory; we will come with our

Presenter(s):

Rachel Piontak, American Indian College Fund
Rachel has been with the American Indian College Fund for three years and currently serves as the Circle of Scholars Program Administrator. In this role, she coordinates current scholar and alumni communications, informal meetup events, and seeks ways to engage past and present scholars with the broader work of the College Fund. Prior to this work, she completed her Masters in Sociology at the University of Cape Town with a focus on social upgrading through mobile-based agricultural extension programs in Uganda.

Jack Soto, American Indian College Fund
Jack is the Program Administrator for Internships and Career Readiness with the American Indian College Fund, and previously served as the Director of the Washington Semester American Indian Program – Washington Internships for Native Students at American University in Washington, DC. Much of his work in focused on organizational cross-cultural competency with his career and academic development being greatly influenced by his time with the National Indian Education Association. He also works to improve academic institutional support of Natives student in higher education as a board member of the National Coalition for the Advancement of Natives in Higher Education.

Stevie Lee, American Indian College Fund
Stevie administers the Tribal College and University Scholarship Program, accounting for more than $4 million in scholarships each year. When not at work, she's pursuing her PhD in Higher Education, with a focus in Diversity and Higher Learning, at the University of Denver. She researches the intersectionality of Indigenous pedagogy, Inclusive Excellence, as it relates to student achievement, access, and equity for underrepresented groups. She also sub-specializes in research methods, allowing her to critically assess utilizing quantitative and qualitative research.

2.7 - Choosing the Best Scholarship Application Software for Your University
Monday, 10.10.16 - 11:15am-12:30pm

Description: This session will detail the specific RFP process that one public university went through to evaluate and choose a scholarship application software that provides an enterprise-wide solution. It will share the process from identifying the specific needs of the university, to vetting the initial multiple vendor submissions, to evaluating the vendor finalists, including student feedback, for the final software choice. It will also provide specific examples of the initial RFP submission request, various survey tools used to evaluate the vendors though out the process, including a brief discussion about helpful hints for overall vendor comparison.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. gain a better understanding of the overall RFP process, 2. obtain tools for helping during the evaluation process, and 3. Learn helpful hints from lessons learned.

Track: Scholarship Programs at Colleges and Universities

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Beth Barnette Knight, IUPUI
Beth Barnette is the Director of the Office of Student Scholarships at Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). Ms. Knight over-sees the coordination and administration of over $20M in institutional scholarships at IUPUI. She is also responsible for the recruitment and retention of high-ability students to the campus. Ms. Knight received her master’s degree in Communication Studies from IUPUI in 2007. In 2010, she completed the Certificate in Fund Raising Management from The Fundraising School in School of Philanthropy at Indiana University. IUPUI has twice been awarded the NSPA University Provider of the Year Award in 2006 and 2008.

2.8 - Appreciative Inquiry: A Positive Approach to Staff and Community Engagement
Monday, 10.10.16 - 11:15am-12:30pm

Description: Appreciative Inquiry is a revolutionary approach to human and organizational change that dramatically improves performance by studying, discussing, learning from and building on what works (rather than fixing what doesn’t). Its purposefully positive approach has stimulated learning, and fostered innovation, hope and commitment in non-profits, communities and businesses around the world.

Join internationally recognized consultant, author, and trainer Amanda Trosten-Bloom for a foundational experience of Appreciative Inquiry’s philosophy and practice, interspersed with success stories from a variety of settings. Form new and positive connections with other providers, and envision new ways of promoting college success for all students through the power of scholarships.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. gain foundational understanding of Appreciative Inquiry as an approach to promoting college success through scholarships, 2. experience an “appreciative interview” one of the core practices of Appreciative Inquiry, and 3. hear stories illustrating how Appreciative Inquiry builds engagement, enhances productivity and fosters innovative solutions to thorny challenges.

Track: Professional Development

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture and small groups

Presenter(s):

Amanda Trosten-Bloom, Rocky Mountain Center for Positive Change and Corporation for Positive Change
Amanda Trosten-Bloom is a Principal with both the Rocky Mountain Center for Positive Change and Corporation for Positive Change, and a widely acclaimed consultant, master trainer, energizing speaker, and pioneer in the use of Appreciative Inquiry for high engagement, whole system change. Working across sectors in business, nonprofit and government organizations, she builds results oriented partnerships with organizational and community leaders and teams in support of strategic planning, culture change, and organizational excellence. Her clients have included: Hewlett-Packard; the Unitarian Universalist Association; IHS; ACT; Hunter Douglas Window Fashions Division; National Security Administration; Goddard Space Flight Center; The Denver Foundation; and the Cities of Boulder, Denver and Longmont, CO; and Boulder County, CO.

Amanda is also co-author of the best-selling book, The Power of Appreciative Inquiry: A Practical Guide to Positive Change (Berrett-Koehler: 2003 and 2010), considered to be the strongest practical guide to Appreciative Inquiry on the market. Additional publications include Appreciative Leadership: Focus on What Works to Drive Winning Performance and Build a Thriving Organization (McGraw-Hill, 2010); Appreciative Team Development: Positive Questions to Bring Out the Best in Your Team (iUniverse, 2005); the Encyclopedia of Positive Questions – Volume One: Questions to Bring Out the Best at Work (Crown Custom Publishing, 2003 and 2014); and more than a dozen articles and book chapters.

3.1 - Access is Not Enough…Balancing the Equation for Student Success through Effective Postsecondary Partnerships
Monday, 10.10.16 - 1:45pm-3pm

Description: In the ever changing landscape of college access, persistence, and completion, Kauffman Scholars Inc. works to bridge the degree attainment gap of underrepresented low income students from the Greater Kansas City Metropolitan Area. Through investigation, evaluation, and action, Kauffman Scholars has made efforts to help participants (Scholars) successfully navigate the postsecondary experience and prepare them for their transitions from campus to community. Student success can be attributed to effective collaboration with post-secondary partners. This session will explore the creation of mutually beneficial formalized agreements with various postsecondary institutions, referred to as the Kauffman Scholars Postsecondary Network, in an effort to increase the likelihood of success for Scholars. This workshop will also examine the creation of Advisory Councils at numerous postsecondary institutions as an added layer of support for students outside of the classroom. Key components of the agreements and advisory councils will be shared. Challenges, benefits, successes, and lessons learned in implementation will be identified. Additionally, a step by step approach to executing the network concept will also be shared in an effort to support reproducing the concept in other organizations.

Takeaways:  This workshop will take an in depth look at the creation of a postsecondary network of institutions Kauffman Scholars, Inc. has partnered with to support matriculation and persistence through postsecondary education. Facilitators will explore the rationale behind the creation of the network; challenges faced and lessons learned in implementing the network; benefits of the network from a student, postsecondary institution, and CBO perspective; as well as key components of the formal agreements. The goal of this workshop is to share strategies and best practices for creating and maintaining effective partnerships with postsecondary institutions. The audience will leave this session with greater knowledge and understanding of the postsecondary network concept, how the concept can be replicated in other organizations/institutions, and a road map from creation, negotiation, to implementation of a postsecondary network/effective postsecondary partnership. Facilitators will share actual templates of formal agreements with audience members that can be incorporated into various organizations.

Track: Scholarship Program Basics

Format: Breakout Session - Panel - presentation is lead primarily by a group of presenters with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Eric Wilkinson, Kauffman Scholars, Inc.
Eric Wilkinson manages the day-to-day operations of the postsecondary team and provides direct supervision to the Postsecondary Coaches and Advisors. Prior to joining Kauffman Scholars in 2009, Eric spent over five years in higher education working in the areas of admission and student affairs. Eric earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Pittsburg State University.

Ashley Rudd, Kauffman Scholars, Inc.
Ashley Rudd joined Kauffman Scholars in the Winter of 2013 as a Secondary Coach. Ashley later transitioned to a Postsecondary Coach, mentoring Scholars at the collegiate level. Prior to joining the Kauffman Scholars staff, Ashley worked as Support Services Coordinator for the Platte County Board of Services, and as a Special Education Instructional Assistant for the North Kansas City School District. Ashley holds a Bachelor's of Science degree in Behavioral Science with an emphasis in Youth Development and Juvenile Justice.

Cynthia Fails, University of Missouri - Kansas City
Cynthia Fails is the Program Coordinator for the Coaching Program at the University of Missouri - Kansas City. She oversees all components of the program, and serves as an advocate for the scholars’ interests, both on and off campus. Cynthia serves as a liaison to Kauffman Scholars' students and coaching staff, coordinating communication and events to help facilitate the ongoing efforts to build effective relationships.

3.2 - Legal Fundamentals for Scholarship Providers
Monday, 10.10.16 - 1:45pm-3pm

Description: Are you new (or relatively new) to the world of scholarships? If so, you may still be getting familiar with the legal and tax requirements that apply to you as a scholarship provider. For instance, what are the limits around donor participation in the selection process? If you’re raising funds from the public, are you required to register for charitable solicitations? Is the scholarship taxable to the recipient? Do you have to report the scholarship to the IRS? Must you have a scholarship plan? What about record-keeping? This “basics” session, geared toward the private scholarship provider, will tackle these important but often overlooked questions.

Takeaways:  Participants will receive 1. An overview of the legal framework within which private scholarship providers work, 2. Answers to basic but fundamental legal/tax questions that apply to their scholarship programs, and 3. A springboard for building a deeper understanding of the legal/tax parameters for building their scholarship programs.

Track: Scholarship Program Basics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Karen Leaffer, Leaffer Law Group
Karen Leaffer is a recognized leader in the area of nonprofit law, and a frequent presenter at the National Scholarship Providers Association’s Annual Conference. She practiced in some of Denver’s largest, most respected law firms for more than 20 years before forming Leaffer Law Group, a firm whose sole focus is to advance, guide and support the work of nonprofit organizations. She is also a community leader, a mentor and an entrepreneur. It is her extensive experience, combined with her lifelong dedication to serving nonprofits, which makes her a sought-after resource for nonprofit organizations and their advisors.

Karen serves as both general and special counsel to nonprofits, advising them on corporate, tax and transactional matters, including the regulation of private foundations, supporting organizations and donor-advised funds, and the award of scholarships, prizes and other special types of grants.

Karen currently serves as managing editor and contributing author of A Guide for Colorado Nonprofit Organizations, a role she has served since the Guide’s inception in 2007. She also served as a contributing author of the National Scholarship Providers Association’s Scholarship Program Toolkit. Karen has a Martindale-Hubbell AV Preeminent® ranking, and has been recognized in Best Lawyers in America® for Non-Profit/Charities Law (2007-2016), and for Tax Law (2015) and in Law Week Colorado as the Barrister’s Best Nonprofit Attorney (2011, 2013, 2015). In 2014, she received the Denver Business Journal’s Outstanding Women in Business award in the law category.

3.3 - Leatherstocking Tales: Partnering to Build College Success for Underserved Youth
Monday, 10.10.16 - 1:45pm-3pm

Description: Access to college for many students in the Leatherstocking region of central New York State was a locked door with seemingly insurmountable obstacles placed in their path. When scholarship money became available for graduating seniors, too many students never made it to that level. The Clark Foundation recognized the need to intervene early to prevent students from “dropping out.” Thus, the partnership between the scholarship provider and college readiness organization was created 25 years ago.

In 2016, 99% of grade 12 students in the program graduated from high school, and 86% of these graduates will be heading off to college. Learn how the Clark Scholarship Foundation and College for Every Student have created a national model for helping students get to college and attain degrees.

Takeaways:  Attendees will learn about best practices for partnering and cutting edge strategies for helping underserved students become college and career ready. Additionally, signed copies of Dalton’s recently published book, College For Every Student: A Practitioner’s Guide to College and Career Readiness will be available.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Panel - presentation is lead primarily by a group of presenters with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Gary Kuch, The Clark Foundation Scholarship Office
Gary M. Kuch is currently the Director of the Clark Foundation Scholarship Program in Cooperstown, New York. He has over thirty years in public education having retired recently as a Superintendent of Schools. For the last twenty years, he has worked in poor rural schools in which the College for Every Student program has been an integral partner in giving children their dreams back. Working initially as a School Psychologist, Mr. Kuch has a strong background in prevention and building resilience in families and communities. For over 18 years, he worked as a trainer and consultant for the Northeast Regional Center for Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities.

Rick Dalton, College For Every Student
Rick Dalton is the founder, President & CEO of College For Every Student (CFES). For the past 25 years, Dalton has worked to make CFES a national leader in helping underserved students become college and career ready. His doctoral work at Harvard on the connection between organizational behavior and educational opportunity laid the foundation for CFES. While Director of Enrollment at Middlebury College, Dalton created a partnership with a high school in the Bronx that led to the creation of 200 school-college partnerships. Dalton has written more than 150 articles and op-eds on college and career readiness for low-income students. He and a colleague from the University of Michigan authored College for Every Student: A Practitioner’s Guide to Building College and Career Readiness released by Routledge Publishers in August 2016.

3.4 - Satisfactory Academic Progress for Private Scholarships
Monday, 10.10.16 - 1:45pm-3pm

Description: Satisfactory academic progress (SAP) is used to define successful completion of coursework to maintain eligibility for student financial aid. Federal regulations require universities to establish, publish, and apply standards to monitor student progress toward completion of a degree program. Should your private scholarship organization do the same thing? Benefits for the student/organization, implementation/best practice, data and what we learned.

Takeaways:  Participants will get answers to the following questions: 1. What is Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)? 2. What are the federal guidelines/10,000 Degrees guidelines? 3. What grade-point average (or equivalent standard) you need to maintain? 3. How quickly students need to be moving toward graduation (for instance, how many credits students should have successfully completed by the end of each year)? 4. What happens when a student fails to meet SAP? What is the appeal process both for federal and for our private scholarships? Presenters will share data from our implementation and what we learned over the past several years.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Jin Choi, 10,000 Degrees
Jin reieved his bachelors degree from UC Berkeley. Upon graduation, he worked as an Associate Director of Financial Aid for seven years at a private university. For the last five years, he has been working as Manager of the Scholarship Program for 10,000 Degrees.

Yessenia Dominguez, 10,000 Degrees
Yessenia received her bachelors degree from Sonoma State University, where she majored in sociology. Upon graduation, she worked at Loma Verde Elementary school as a teachers aid in a youth development program for kindergarten- first grade. For the last year and a half, she has been working with 10,000 Degrees as a scholarship assistant.

3.5 - Reinventing Scholarships: Innovative Ideas for Pairing Scholarships with Savings to Better Serve Low-Income Students
Monday, 10.10.16 - 1:45pm-3pm

Description: This session will explore innovative ways to pair scholarships and savings to raise children’s college expectations at a young age, facilitate access to higher education, and support low-income students through college completion. Attendees will learn how Children’s Savings Accounts—long-term incentivized savings accounts for postsecondary education started as early as birth or kindergarten—can complement College Promise models by both fostering early aspirations for college and providing young adults with full tuition coverage. Presenters will also discuss the Earn to Learn program, which works with Arizona’s state universities to leverage scholarships funds to tap into federal funding through the Assets for Independence matched savings program and support low-income students through all four years of college.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. explore ideas for how they can use scholarship funds in new ways, such as combining them with Children’s Savings Accounts to reach children at an earlier age and build their college expectations, 2. learn about how to multiply the impact of scholarship funds through combining them with other sources of funds, such as the Assets for Independence federal matched savings program, and 3. consider ways that they might apply the innovative ideas presented during the session to their own programs to increase college access and completion by low-income scholarship recipients.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Panel - presentation is lead primarily by a group of presenters with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Carl Rist, CFED
Carl Rist is the Director of Children’s Savings and Senior Advisor for Asset Building at CFED. In this role, he directs the full array of resources at CFED (policy, research, field-building, technical assistance and fundraising support) towards achieving CFED’s long-term vision of a Children’s Savings Account (CSA) for every child in the U.S. by 2025. Most recently, Mr. Rist was the Director of the 1:1 Fund at CFED, an innovative effort to raise incentive dollars for CSA programs. Prior to directing the 1:1 Fund, Mr. Rist was vice president of Assets and Opportunity Programs and director of Asset Building at CFED. Mr. Rist earned an M.A. in public policy from Duke University and holds an undergraduate degree from Davidson College.

Dr. William Elliott III, University of Kansas, Center on Assets, Education and Inclusion
Dr. William Elliott III is an associate professor at the University of Kansas (KU) and founder of the Center on Assets, Education, and Inclusion (AEDI) in KU’s School of Social Welfare. He is a leading researcher in the fields of children's savings and college debt. However, his research interests are broadly focused on public policies related to issues of economic inequality and social development. Numerous news and media outlets such as the National Journal, PBS News Hour, NPR, US News, the Washington Monthly, the Washington Post, and others have featured his work. His research has served as the impetus for Children’s Savings Account (CSA) programs and policies across the U.S. He is currently conducting research on the following CSA programs: Prosperity Kids in New Mexico, K2C in San Francisco, Promise Indiana, and the Harold Alfond College challenge in Maine.

Kate Hoffman, Earn to Learn
Kate Hoffman is the founder and executive director of Earn to Learn, a nationally recognized social impact organization that empowers low-to-moderate income students to successfully complete college by providing matched-savings scholarships, personal finance training, peer mentoring, and success coaching. After spending many years in the financial services sector, Kate has become a champion for ensuring low-to-moderate income students in Arizona have every opportunity to get a college education, and that Earn to Learn is focused on developing a financially savvy, skilled, diversified workforce.

3.6 - Beyond the Scholarship: Preparing Community College and Community College Transfer Students for Long Term Success
Monday, 10.10.16 - 1:45pm-3pm

Description: With increased emphasis on career readiness and return on investment, scholarship providers need to think beyond financial aspects of awards. Please join us to learn about the unique needs of high achieving, low-income community college and transfer students and how your organization can best serve and support this population for success with college completion and beyond. Several scholarship providers will share best practices and how we are encouraging leadership development, academic excellence, and increased college completion rates within the community college and transfer population. Find out how you can best serve this student population and make a difference not just in their lives but in the lives of their families and communities for generations to come.

Takeaways:  Particpants will 1. gain an understanding of community college and transfer student populations, 2. learn why scholarships for this population are a great investment, 3. hear examples of available resources and support to encourage completion and lifetime success of community college and transfer scholarship recipients, and 4. Learn how to set students up for successful transfer to a four year college and beyond.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Heather Johnson, Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society
Prior to joining the Phi Theta Kappa Foundation Team, Heather worked in Phi Theta Kappa’s Scholarship Programs Department for nine years. Prior to joining the Headquarters staff, she was associated with Concordia University in Portland, Oregon, Assistant Director of Admissions, working specifically with recruitment of transfer students.

Heather attended Concordia University in Portland, graduating with a Master’s in Business Administration in 2004 as well as completing a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration in 1997. Heather also graduated with an Associate of Arts degree in 1994 from Central Oregon Community College. She became a member of Phi Theta Kappa in 1993 while attending COCC.

As Scholarship Developer & Prospect Researcher, Heather helps identify potential donors and develop new scholarship opportunities for Phi Theta Kappa members. She also oversees all development, design, and review of all online scholarship applications and is responsible for all aspects of judging and scholar selection.

Beth Zielinski, Jack Kent Cooke Foundation
Beth A. Zielinski is the Senior Higher Education Programs Adviser at the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation. Since 2010, Beth has worked with the Cooke Foundation's Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship to provide advising and programming for the scholars, who are exceptionally promising students with have financial need. She has over a decade of experience aiding high-achieving students from diverse backgrounds including non-traditional, first generation, and undocumented students in creating successful transfer pathways.

Beth graduated with a M.A.Ed. in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from Virginia Tech and with honors from Randolph-Macon Woman's College with a B.A. in Biology and Sociology/Anthropology and a Certificate in Human Services.

Nancy Sanchez, Kaplan Educational Foundation
Bio coming soon

3.7 - Advice and Tips for New Scholarship Professionals in Administering Scholarships from Seasoned Scholarship Professionals
Monday, 10.10.16 - 1:45pm-3pm

Description: College scholarships have long played an important role in ensuring access to post-secondary education in the U.S. However, we are now as a nation increasingly recognizing the imperative of focusing on post-secondary persistence and completion as well. A panel of four seasoned scholarship administrators from diverse campuses will share their best practices, lessons learned, tips and advice about administering scholarships on their campuses. This conversation session will provide an opportunity for new professionals to learn from seasoned scholarship professionals to identify the most effective way to administer scholarships on their campus or in their organization. The session will also provide advice for professionals at any point in their career.

Takeaways:  This session will 1. enable seasoned scholarship professionals to provide guidance to less-experienced scholarship professionals regarding scholarship administration, 2. allow new professionals to learn lessons and tips from veterans in the profession to implement on their campus, 3. create a learning environment of successes, failure, lessons learned, and comradery, and 4. provide mentoring opportunities between seasoned professionals and new professionals.

Track: Scholarship Programs at Colleges and Universities

Format: Breakout Session - Panel - presentation is lead primarily by a group of presenters with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Lori Pence, Purdue University
Lori Pence is an Associate Director of Student Success in the College of Engineering at Purdue University, West Lafayette. She has been serving students and families in academia since 1995. Since 2006, she has administered scholarship programs at Purdue University. Lori has transformed and lead scholarship innovation practices within academic units but also campus wide by partnering with the Offices of Financial Aid and University Development. Lori’s success in administering scholarships centers on being visionary, strategic, innovative, collaborative, action-oriented, solution focused, change and change management, developing positive professional relationships, and working as a team. People, actions, and attitude are what make a difference to students as well as to colleagues.

Johnna Martinez, Bellevue University
Johnna Martinez is the Director for Scholarships and Grants at Bellevue University, in Bellevue, Nebraska.  She is responsible for managing and developing strategies, processes, and procedures to effectively administer all institutionally related scholarships and grants for the University.  As a stand-alone department, Johnna’s team collaborates with the Financial Aid Department, Student Financial Services, Student Finance, the Business Office, Enrollment, Advising, Athletics, Advancement and the individual colleges to ensure a smooth centralized process for current and prospective students to apply for scholarships.  Johnna joined the University 9 years ago initially as a High School Outreach Counselor; recruiting high school seniors to the University.  She has always worked with scholarships and in 2011 took over as Manager for the newly formed Scholarships and Grants Department.  She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a Master of Science from Bellevue University. 

Garrick Hildebrand, University of Arkansas
Garrick Hildebrand is the senior associate director of scholarships and financial aid at the University of Arkansas.  Garrick assists the executive direct with the leadership of the scholarship and financial aid office.  His primary job duties include management of central scholarship programs, direct oversight of retention staff and scholarship processors, budgeting, as well as advising campus scholarship programs.  Garrick has served in the academic scholarship office since November 2007, he holds a bachelor’s degree in history and a master’s degree in higher education leadership both from the University of Arkansas.

Larry Sparkman, University of Southern Mississippi
Dr. Larry A. Sparkman serves as the Director of the Luckyday Foundation Citizenship Scholars Program, a privately funded scholarship and four-year student development program that facilitates a living-learning community, service learning, and servant leadership at The University of Southern Mississippi. The Luckyday Citizenship Program has been recognized as a Best Practice in Student Affairs the state of Mississippi.

Sharon Lusk, Hamilton Holt School
Sharon Lusk has over 35 years of experience in adult education at Rollins College.  She is the Assistant Dean of the Hamilton Holt School, a program that serves the educational needs of non-traditional learners through undergraduate, graduate, and lifelong learning courses.  Sharon’s experience at Rollins has encompassed student services, advising, and academic administration.  She is currently responsible for oversight of the Hamilton Holt School scholarship program, including promotion and oversight of the application, awarding, and renewal processes. She holds a Master of Arts in Counseling Degree from Rollins College and received the Best Practice Silver Award from the National Association of Student Affairs Professionals and Administrators, National Scholarship Providers’ Association Best Practice Award, and the Jon C. Dalton Institutes Best Practice Award. Larry’s previous professional experiences include: serving as an adjunct professor and guest lecturer, directing a first year experience office, facilitating orientation for new students, directing student recruitment and enlistment, leading enrollment management teams, campus ministry, serving as a children’s program coordinator at a psychological rehabilitation hospital, and working as a mental health professional in correctional institutions. Larry holds a Master of Social Work from Louisiana State University, Master of Divinity from New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, and a Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration from The University of Southern Mississippi.

3.8 - Appreciative Leadership: Strategies and Practices that Turn Potential to Power
Monday, 10.10.16 - 1:45pm-5:15pm (30 minutes break)

Description: A social transformation is taking place in organizations worldwide. Leadership practices are moving from authoritarian to collaborative, from fear-based to strengths-based, and from “talking at” to inquiry and dialogue. Appreciative Leadership and the power of positive change are at the vanguard of this transformation.

In this half-day workshop, internationally recognized consultant and author Amanda Trosten-Bloom, describes Appreciative Leadership: a relational process that mobilizes creative potential and unleashes positive power.

Takeaways:  Participants will explore five core strategies of Appreciative Leadership that will engage and inspire both staff and students, fostering collaboration, creativity, and commitment to our collective mission.  In addition, they will experience personal, one-to-one, and team practices that can turbo-charge our capacity to promote college success for all students through the power of scholarships.

Track: Professional Development

Format: Workshop - Lecture as well as individual and small group activities

Presenter(s):

Amanda Trosten-Bloom, Rocky Mountain Center for Positive Change and Corporation for Positive Change
Amanda Trosten-Bloom is a Principal with both the Rocky Mountain Center for Positive Change and Corporation for Positive Change, and a widely acclaimed consultant, master trainer, energizing speaker, and pioneer in the use of Appreciative Inquiry for high engagement, whole system change. Working across sectors in business, nonprofit and government organizations, she builds results oriented partnerships with organizational and community leaders and teams in support of strategic planning, culture change, and organizational excellence. Her clients have included: Hewlett-Packard; the Unitarian Universalist Association; IHS; ACT; Hunter Douglas Window Fashions Division; National Security Administration; Goddard Space Flight Center; The Denver Foundation; and the Cities of Boulder, Denver and Longmont, CO; and Boulder County, CO.

Amanda is also co-author of the best-selling book, The Power of Appreciative Inquiry: A Practical Guide to Positive Change (Berrett-Koehler: 2003 and 2010), considered to be the strongest practical guide to Appreciative Inquiry on the market. Additional publications include Appreciative Leadership: Focus on What Works to Drive Winning Performance and Build a Thriving Organization (McGraw-Hill, 2010); Appreciative Team Development: Positive Questions to Bring Out the Best in Your Team (iUniverse, 2005); the Encyclopedia of Positive Questions – Volume One: Questions to Bring Out the Best at Work (Crown Custom Publishing, 2003 and 2014); and more than a dozen articles and book chapters.

4.1 - Evaluation Framework for Scholarship Programs
Monday, 10.10.16 - 3:45pm-5pm

Description: Wondering how to evaluate programs or services? Unsure what evaluation entails? This session will present a basic framework for evaluation meant to serve as a springboard for further conversation within an organization. The presenter will discuss different types of assessment and evaluation, methodology options, evidence collection and analysis, budget considerations and more. Participants will gain a better understanding of evaluation options, with a glimpse at scholarship evaluation case studies, and a worksheet to begin evaluation planning.

Takeaways:  Participants will learn 1. options to consider in evaluation design, 2. evaluation terminology and definitions, and 3. quick case studies. In addition, an evaluation planning worksheet will be provided.

Track: Scholarship Program Basics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Kim Stezala, Stezala Consulting, LLC
Kimberly Stezala is President of Stezala Consulting, LLC, a company that assists scholarship providers, foundations and educational organizations to improve their vitality through objective analysis and consulting. Kim is focused on the strategy, evaluation, and improvement of programs with the overall goal of strengthening outcomes for youth and families in the college pipeline.

Students and parents know Kim as The Scholarship Lady,® through www.scholarshiplady.com and her book Scholarships 101: The Real-World Guide to Getting Cash for College.

She has been a guest speaker for the National Scholarship Providers Association for 10 years and was the content development consultant for the NSPA’s online toolkit for scholarship providers.

4.2 - Instagoogletweetface? Social Media for Scholarship Engagement
Monday, 10.10.16 - 3:45pm-5pm

Description: This session will be presenting on the integration of various social media tools and platforms into an effective communication plan to create and tailor messaging to students. It will introduce how social media tools can boost student engagement for the retention of scholars. The presentation will then include a case study of social media platforms used as example of a university social media plan. The session will include an open forum of best practices and procedures of social media.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. receive an introduction to social media platforms and tools and 2. create a social media plan for key communication with a student audience.

Track: Scholarship Program Basics

Format: Breakout Session - Panel - presentation is lead primarily by a group of presenters with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Erin Steinfort, IUPUI
Erin Steinfort is the Senior Assistant Director, overseeing Special Scholarship Programs in the Office of Student Scholarships at Indiana University- Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). Mrs. Steinfort processes and manages scholarship and fellowship awards for the university, including the coordination and management of the Cox Scholarship program; communicating with departments on new procedures for awarding. She is also responsible for serving as the campus NCAA Financial Aid Representative to coordinate the processing and verifying of eligible of athletic awards and financial aid. Mrs. Steinfort received her bachelor’s of Science degree from Purdue University in Financial Planning and Counseling in 2006. She received her Masters of Arts in Public Relations Management in 2014.

4.4 - Results of the 2015 NACUBO Tuition Discounting Study
Monday, 10.10.16 - 3:45pm-5pm

Description: The session will discuss the results of the most recent NACUBO Tuition Discounting Study, with a focus on both the concept of tuition discounting -- expressed by the formulae NACUBO uses to calculate institutional and student tuition discount rates -- and trends in institutional and student discount rates over the past ten years.The session will conclude with data showing the effects of discount rates on schools' net tuition revenue, trends in funded institutional grants, and need-based versus non-need-based grants.

Takeaways:  Participants will take away both the concept of tuition discounting in the NACUBO survey and data on trends in tuition discounting.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Lesley McBain, Ph.D., NACUBO
Lesley McBain is Assistant Director, Research and Policy Analysis at the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO). In this role, she works on research studies such as the Tuition Discounting Study and other studies on higher education finance issues. She has also worked at the U.S. Department of Education, the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) within the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU). Dr. McBain earned a Ph.D. in higher education from the University of California, Los Angeles; she also holds an M.A. in education from UCLA and a M.S. in higher education from Drexel University.

4.5 - Snapp Your App
Monday, 10.10.16 - 3:45pm-5pm

Description: ScholarSnapp (www.scholarsnapp.org) helps students complete more scholarship and college applications in less time. Most applications ask for the same information that has to be entered over and over again. ScholarSnapp can autocomplete most fields on an application, and saves hours of time. As a provider, what are the benefits to you? It's free. Saves your applicants time. Helps applicants who do not receive your scholarship reuse their application data to apply for other scholarships.  Puts students in control of reusing their own data. This year, a centralized application website has been added to the ScholarSnapp functionality that allows students to manage their application data in a single place. Please join us to learn more about how ScholarSnapp works.  More than half a million students have opted in to ScholarSnapp…have you?

Takeaways:  Participants will learn about the new real-time data transfer of Scholar Snapp and that it is as easy as ever to adopt technically.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Kevin Byrne, Michael & Susan Dell Foundation
Kevin oversees the foundation’s giving in the United States which ranges from large data systems work for better student-centered information for the classroom to projects supporting local nonprofits providing vital services to low income families in Central Texas. Leveraging more than two decades of working to provide better lives for low income students, he joined the foundation to create the Dell Scholars Program, a college retention and graduation program that is graduating scholars at four times the national rate. Kevin has been heavily involved in ways to leverage technology and data for the benefit of students and parents through his work with the Texas Student Data System, Ed-Fi, and Scholar Snapp. In addition, he has worked with national, regional, and local charter management organizations and college preparation and completion programs to get more low income students through college. In addition, Kevin works with our Central Texas grantees that encompass programs working to better prepare students academically to programs that enrich the lives of foster and adoptive children. He also works with our Health portfolio on projects ranging from transforming health outcomes for a local community to the creation of Dell Medical School. He has served on various boards that align with his passions.

Mike Baur, Michael & Susan Dell Foundation
Mike manages a portfolio of investments in the U.S. data-driven education practice focused on unlocking innovation by improving data interoperability through standardization initiatives. He works with state, district, and vendor organizations which execute projects to empower educators and students by providing the infrastructure to enable real-time access to accurate, actionable education data. Prior to joining the foundation, Mike was Managing Director at Academic Partnerships where he led efforts to promote the utilization of technology in delivering universal and affordable access to higher education institutes around the world. Earlier in his career, Mike was in higher education consulting and sales leadership for SunGard Higher Education and Ellucian where he was an Enterprise Architect and Senior Technical Consultant. Mike has a bachelor’s in computer science and a MBA from Harding University.

4.6 - Emergency Aid Programs: Small Grants. Right Time. Big Impact.
Monday, 10.10.16 - 3:45pm-5pm

Description: Does your organization or school provide an emergency aid program to help students when they are faced with unforeseen financial emergencies? More and more emergency aid programs are being offered as an additional tool to provide the necessary support to students so they persist and complete their degree programs. In this session we will talk about how “just-in-time” small grants can make a big impact for student success. Research supports there is a need for emergency aid programs and that they are effective; however, there are challenges that come with them. We’ll also discuss lessons learned and best practices for offering an emergency aid program.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. understand the need and impact of emergency aid programs, and how they are a critical piece of creating more effective scholarship and educational support programs, 2. learn some best practices for emergency aid programs, and 3. see how emergency aid programs complement, not replace the other assistance students receive (scholarships, financial aid, etc.).

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Mimi Daly Larson, Scholarship America
Mimi Daly Larson is the Senior Vice President of Marketing and Public Policy at Scholarship America. Mimi is responsible for Scholarship America’s marketing and brand strategy, public policy and advocacy initiatives, and advancing the organization’s strategic awareness and revenue opportunities. With more than 20 years of experience in marketing and fundraising, she has held multiple executive leadership positions at nonprofit organizations. Mimi has served on the boards of several non-profit organizations and done consulting projects in both the nonprofit and for profit sectors. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Speech Communications from Macalester College and a Mini-MBA in Nonprofit Leadership from the University of St. Thomas.

4.7 - Support Beyond the Money: Partnerships with Universities to Create Learning Communities
Monday, 10.10.16 - 3:45pm-5pm

Description: The Buffett Foundation Scholarship Program has been funding students with financial need from the state of Nebraska for decades. There are currently over 4,000 students on scholarship in Nebraska. Each year, the Foundation awards around 1,200 scholarships to incoming first-year students who plan to attend a Nebraska, public institution. In 2008, the program entered an important partnership with the University of Nebraska System to create William H. Thompson Scholars Learning Communities at each of the three largest system schools:

University of Nebraska – Kearney,
University of Nebraska – Lincoln, and
University of Nebraska – Omaha.

The Foundation supports students through scholarship funding, but also funds Learning Communities and the staffs who run them at each of the three campuses. We will begin the presentation with a short video made by one of the Learning Communities that paints a picture of the benefits student scholars see from participation in the community beyond the financial support. After the video, we will give an overview of the content of the session.

Overall, this session will discuss:

• Administrative structure of the partnership;
• Key Components to the Learning Communities;
• Communication strategies with university staff and students in the program; and
• Reporting expectations.

Administrative Structure - We will begin with a discussion of how the partnership is organized at each institution, the central administration office, and the Foundation. We will discuss the importance of creating clear lines of responsibility and communication. Additionally, we will present important policies and procedures that guide the work of all professionals connected to the programs.

Key Components of Learning Communities - We will spend time discussing the structure and key components of each learning community. Each campus has been given the autonomy to create the needed support structures and requirements to best fit the campus culture at their respective institution. However, the Foundation has some specific policies and requirements each campus must follow. We will discuss how each campus is different and the different cultures that exist within these Learning Communities.

Highlighting the programming differences, we will present what we see as best practices when working with students who are awarded the Buffett Scholarship within a learning community.

Communication Strategies - It is important to set up expectations early about when communication between the Foundation and the universities is important and when it is critical. We will discuss how we use video-conferencing, monthly conference calls, annual face-to-face meetings and other methods of communicating to ensure the program policies are consistent across campuses and as a way to brainstorm ways to work through challenging programmatic issues or student concerns.

Reporting Expectations - Each year, the Learning Communities submit an annual report to the Foundation outlining the program goals, program accomplishments and goals for the upcoming year. We will discuss the format of these reports and the role they play in funding and new initiatives.

The session will end with an opportunity for attendees to ask questions and offer insight related to their experiences working in similar partnerships and/or learning communities. Additionally, we will ask attendees to brainstorm ways they can personally implement aspects of the partnership and/or learning community support with their scholars. Engagement of Audience:

Audience members will be asked to participate throughout the session. Within each topic area, we plan to present the lessons learned and practices our program uses, but also ask members in the room to participate by sharing their experiences in such partnerships and in building support services for students.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. gain insight into funding support services at system-wide institutions, 2. learn about key programmatic components of learning communities supporting low-income students, and 3. understand the importance of good communication and administrative organization and some tactics used, when there are multiple stakeholders involved.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Kellie Pickett, Susan T. Buffett Foundation
Kellie Pickett is the Director of Scholarships at The Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation. Before joining the Foundation, she spent her career working with college students through roles in Admissions, Orientation, Leadership, and Civic Engagement at various universities across the country. In her current role, she strives to provide access and success opportunities for low-income students in the state of Nebraska.

Char Oehm, Susan T. Buffett Foundation
Char Oehm is the Scholarship Coordinator at The Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation. Char’s background in education began with her service to the Omaha Public Schools before joining the Foundation. She works closely with the colleges and universities across the state of Nebraska to provide the necessary support for students on scholarship.

Kelli King, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Kelli King is entering her sixth year as the Director for the William H. Thompson Scholars Learning Community at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. Before relocating to Nebraska, Ms. King lived in New York City where she was attending the Teachers College of Columbia University. Prior to her graduate work at Columbia University, she taught a myriad of social studies courses in a variety of schools.

5.1 - Financial Aid 101 - The Pulse of the Aid Cycle
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 9:45am-11am

Description: Financial Aid is a system of acronyms and digits that can be confusing at best, and confounding at worst. Join us for a conversation on the reality of what financial aid is, can, and can't do for our students.

Takeaways:  Participants will gain a basic understanding of financial aid principles, policies, and guidelines.

Track: Scholarship Program Basics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Sharon Harper, The Denver Foundation
Sharon Harper is the Director of Scholarship Programs with The Denver Foundation. Her focus is on the administration of funds that focus on higher education and donor/institution programming. She has worked in financial aid and scholarships for eighteen years in both private and public four-year schools. Sharon holds a B.A. in English Literature, an MBA in Finance and Accounting and an MA in Psychology. She brings a variety of experiences into her work as she seeks to create solid and lasting relationships between scholarship donors, the higher education community, and the students our donors endeavor to support. Sharon’s focus is on maximizing students' awards, and donor stewardship. When not working, she enjoys reading, home renovating and travelling. Sharon is not a fan of the Oxford Comma.

5.2 - More than Just the Money: How Coaching Can Increase Graduation Rates for Low-Income Students
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 9:45am-11am

Description: With the rising costs of college tuition and low rates of graduation, students are leaving school in debt and with little job preparedness. Although much of the emphasis is on college access and affordability, there is a need to support low-income students all the way through to graduation. This session will share an overview of the Making Waves College and Alumni Program (CAP) and describe a scholarship disbursal framework that includes a combination of academic, career, and financial literacy coaching. This framework was designed to increase college retention and graduation rates so students receive not only the monetary support they need, but the additional guidance to tackle the obstacles that can get in the way of graduation.

Takeaways:  Participants will learn how coaching can push low-income college students to achieve their goals while addressing obstacles related to retention and college graduation. Presenters will provide a detailed overview of the programming that drives the Making Waves College and Alumni Program.

Track: Scholarship Program Basics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Ivette Chavez, Making Waves Foundation
Ivette Chavez was born and raised in East Los Angeles, California. She is a first generation college graduate who earned her bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley in 2006 in Rhetoric with a concentration in Public Discourse. In 2014, she earned her master’s degree at the California State University, East Bay in Public Administration with a concentration in Organizational Management and Policy Analysis. In 2005, she started her career in financial aid as an intern in the Business Department of the Making Waves Education Program. In 2009, she transitioned to the position as College Program Administrator and is currently the Lead College Financial Services Coordinator for the Making Waves College and Alumni Program (CAP). Her passion for education and financial literacy is the driving force in her career. She is a strong believer that higher education should be affordable and attainable for everyone.

May Melehan, Making Waves Foundation
May Melehan has been working in education for almost 15 years beginning her career tutoring middle and high school students. She attended the University of San Francisco and earned a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology with a minor in Ethnic Studies. Later, she obtained a Master’s degree in Sociology and Education with an emphasis on Educational Policy at Teachers College at Columbia University. She moved from New York to Portland, Oregon and worked for an organization coaching thousands of students in colleges and universities all over the country. It was through these experiences she learned the value of coaching and its potential to support students to retain and graduate from college. In 2013, she came back to California to lead the coaching department in the Making Waves College and Alumni Program (CAP). She has a strong belief that education, specifically institutions of higher education, serve as spaces of opportunity and upward mobility leading to a greater world impact for all students.

5.3 - Student Hunger, Housing Insecurity, and Unmet Financial Need: Overcoming Barriers to College Completion
Monday, 10.10.16 - 3:45pm-5pm

Description: In this session, participants will learn more about the scope of student hunger and housing insecurity and innovative practices colleges and community partners are engaging in to address these road blocks to persistence and completion. We will highlight original research in this area and provide examples of best practices in helping students access additional financial supports beyond traditional financial aid. Participants will also learn how institutional, local, state and federal policies can better support low-income students to overcome these barriers.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. gain a deeper understanding of the scope of student financial need, 2. receive an overview of best practices in helping students access additional financial supports to address hunger and other non-academic barriers to completion, and 3. obtain knowledge of potential state and federal policy changes that will help more students address hunger and other financial struggles.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Panel - presentation is lead primarily by a group of presenters with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Amy Ellen Duke-Benfield, Center for Law and Social Policy
Amy Ellen Duke-Benfield is a senior policy analyst at Center for Law and Social Policy's Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success. Ms. Duke-Benfield's focus is access to and success in postsecondary education and training for low-income students. She analyzes and advocates for policies that better serve low-income adults and other non-traditional students and provides technical assistance to federal, state and local advocates and governments in these areas.  She also directed CLASP’s Benefits Access for College Completion initiative, which sought to increase access to public benefits and financial aid for low-income students at community colleges.

Sara Goldrick-Rab, Temple University
Sara Goldrick-Rab is a Professor of Higher Education Policy and Sociology at Temple University, and Founder at the Wisconsin HOPE Lab. Her research examines the intended and unintended consequences of the college-for-all movement in the United States. She is the recipient of the William T. Grant Foundation’s Faculty Scholars Award and the American Educational Research Association’s Early Career Award. In fall 2016, the University of Chicago will publish her latest book, Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream.

5.4 - The Battle Against Award Displacement - Two Providers Efforts
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 9:45am-11am

Description: Central Scholarship, a 92-year old statewide nonprofit in Maryland, awarding $1 million annually in scholarships and interest-free loans to low-income students, will share the story of a Maryland state bill that would restrict the practice of award displacement at state institutions. The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, a private foundation dedicated to advancing the education of exceptionally promising students who have financial need, will share their process for providing last-dollar scholarships that mitigate award displacement.

Takeaways:  The presenters will tell the story of the Maryland state bill and provide tips and lessons learned for those who are interested in getting into advocacy. Attendees will learn about proven processes that mitigate award displacement.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Michele Waxman Johnson, Central Scholarship
Michele joined the staff of Central Scholarship in February 2011, where her focus is on advocacy, strategic plan implementation, and College Cash® planning and curriculum development. Michele writes op-eds on higher education affordability issues, and is presenter for College Cash®: Managing Student Loans, and co-presenter for College Cash®: Parent’s Guide to Finding and Funding College. Michele earned a Master’s degree in Planning from the University of Virginia, a B.A. in Urban Studies from the University of Maryland, College Park, and a certificate in nonprofit governance from the University at Albany. Michele previously served as Executive Director of a local community leadership program for 11 years, and was a local political candidate in 2010. She serves as a member of the Board of Directors of Congressman Elijah Cummings’ Youth Program (ECYP).

Barbara Weber, Jack Kent Cooke Foundation
As the grants administration manager, Barbara oversees the administration of the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation’s grant and scholarship payments related to higher education. Prior to her work at the Foundation, Barbara served as vice president of operations for Scholarship America’s Scholarship Management Services division. In this role, she provided oversight for the distribution of $165M to 66,000 students annually through the administration of more than 1,200 scholarship, tuition reimbursement, education assistance and loan programs. Barbara holds a B.A. in Business Administration from Gustavus Adolphus College and an M.B.A. from the University of Saint Thomas Opus School of Business.

5.5 - Trends and the Changing Landscape in Higher Education
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 9:45am-11am

Description: This session will present data concerning major trends and changes affecting scholarships and higher education, including changes in state support of postsecondary education, changes in high school GPA, student loan debt, graduation rates and college affordability. Generally, the trends are all getting worse. The data underscores the need for scholarships to reduce the student debt burden, especially among low-income students.

Takeaways: The participants will 1. have data they can use to justify creating and expanding scholarship programs for low-income students and 2. question the wisdom of providing low-income students with loans, as opposed to grants and scholarships, to enable access to a college education. 

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Mark Kantrowitz, Cappex.com LLC
Mark Kantrowitz is a leading national expert on scholarships, the FAFSA, student loans and education tax benefits; he has written four bestselling books about planning and paying for college. He is currently Publisher and VP of Strategy of Cappex.com, a free web site that connects students with colleges and scholarships. He has previously served as publisher of Edvisors, Fastweb and FinAid and as a member of the NSPA board of directors. He has testified before Congress and federal/state agencies about student aid policy on several occasions. Mark has been quoted in more than 5,000 articles in newspapers and magazines over the last five years. He has written for the Washington Post, Money Magazine, New York Times and Wall Street Journal.

5.6 - Combining Scholarships and Service Programs for Student Recruitment and Retention
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 9:45am-11am

Description: NIU was the recipient of the 2015 SPOY award for unique recruitment and retention initiatives. This session will focus on the specific service scholars program that received this honor, as well as discuss other service and research scholarship programs that NIU uses as recruitment and retention tools.

Takeaways:  Takeaways will include idea generation for creating or adapting your own service or research scholarship programs.

Track: Scholarship Programs at Colleges and Universities

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Anne Hardy, Northern Illinois University
Anne Hardy is the Director of the Scholarship Office at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, IL. She has 19 years of experience in enrollment management operations, the last seven spent in financial aid and scholarships.

5.7 - Advanced Microsoft Outlook Functionality with Email and Calendar
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 9:45am-11am

Description: This training assumes participants are current users of Outlook and understand the basic functionality. The training will focus on taking the next step with Outlook with email and calendar capabilities. Participants will learn how to search, craft, and manage email more efficiently using Outlook tools. Participants will gain a better understanding of how to customize Outlook for their preferences in particular with viewing and searching.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. understand the view options and how to customize views in Email and Calendar, 2. learn how to create email templates and Quickparts to use the same language with other recipients, 3. understand the use and function of Outlook Quicksteps, 4. understand how to use the Search Folders to find emails quickly, 5. understand Advanced Search tools, understand sharing calendars and emails and permissions functionality, 6. learn how to create Groups for sending emails to multiple people and groups, and 7. review the various options and preferences available in Outlook.

Track: Professional Development

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

K.J. McCorry, Officiency, Inc.
K.J. McCorry is the owner of Officiency Enterprises, Inc. a consulting company based out of Boulder, CO. K.J. consults in a wide-variety of topics including productivity, systems improvement, records management, and sustainability. She is the author of Organize Your Work Day In No Time, by Que Publishing. She has appeared New York Times, International Herald Tribune, Chicago Tribune, Real Simple, CNN Money, Better Homes & Gardens with regular TV and radio appearances. K.J. has been nominated twice by her peers for the prestigious Founders Award with the National Association of Professional Organizing, recognizing leaders who have furthered the productivity industry. She was also selected as a finalist for the 2008 Oppenheimer Funds Entrepreneur of the Year Award, who recognizes entrepreneurs who have successfully built businesses and positively impacted the community. She currently resides in Boulder, CO.

6.1 - Implementing Early FAFSA and Looking Towards Further Simplification
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 1:15pm-2:30pm

Description: Join representatives from community-based organizations, financial aid directors, and admissions counselors for updates on Early FAFSA as it rolls out this month as well as a discussion about new possibilities to further simplify the FAFSA.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. gain knowledge of changes to FAFSA, 2. learn about interaction with aid administrators and admission counselors, and 3. become empowered advocates for FAFSA simplification.

Track: Scholarship Program Basics

Format: Breakout Session - Panel - presentation is lead primarily by a group of presenters with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Kim Cook, National College Access Network
Kim Cook, NCAN's executive director since 2008, has worked in the higher education and college access field for her entire professional career, including experience in undergraduate admissions and financial aid, administration of a last-dollar scholarship program, and a succession of responsibilities at NCAN including Director of Government Relations, Assistant Director, and Executive Vice President. Ms. Cook also served as the Interim Executive Director of the Ohio College Access Network. She serves on the College Board's College Planning Advisory Board, the U.S. Department of Education’s National Training for Counselors and Mentors advisory panel, the National Education Working Group on Foster Care and Education, and the editorial board of the Journal of College Access. She is often consulted to speak on federal policy issues and building college access networks and community-based college access programs. Prior to joining NCAN in 1999, she was a Senior Program Associate at Plan for Social Excellence, Inc., a foundation supporting innovative projects in education, and served as its Grants Manager and Scholars Program Manager. Previously, she was as a college admission counselor at Pace University in New York. She holds a Masters in Public Administration from Pace University and a Bachelors degree in Communications, Law, Economics and Government from The American University (Washington, DC). She has completed continuing PD through courses in Georgetown University’s Certificate in Non-Profit Management and Harvard University’s Strategic Perspectives in Nonprofit Management institute.

Stephen Payne, National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators
Stephen recently graduated from the Pennsylvania State University with a bachelor’s degree in both educational policy and communication arts. In addition to studying education policy, Stephen served as an intern in the Office of Government Affairs at Penn State and also spent a summer in D.C. working on student aid issues with the federal relations team at the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU).

Tania Johnson-Rachkoskie, National Association for College Admission Counseling
Tania Rachkoskie is the Director of Education and Training for NACAC. Tania brings with her more than 15 years of college counseling and college admissions experience. Her time at The Common Application as the Director of Outreach, The Burlington School as the Director of College Counseling and Director Admissions provide her with insight into the high school counselor perspective of the process. Tania started her career in college admissions at Muhlenberg College where she was responsible for student of color recruitment. She continued working with underserved student populations while at Bucknell University and Guilford College. Tania earned a B.A. in Psychology from Muhlenberg College, an M.A. in Liberal Studies and a certificate in Non-profit management from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and a Certificate in College Counseling from the University of California San Diego Extension. Tania is currently completing coursework at Northeastern University in the MEd. Higher Education program.

6.2 - #InequityPutsUsInJeopardy
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 1:15pm-2:30pm

Description: As follow-up to the General Session Show Me Democracy, filmmaker Dan Parris and two interns, who led an effort to reveal the inequities in their state’s merit-based scholarship program, will present a case study of the evolution of a student-led advocacy agenda. Inspired by a disrespectful legislator disregarding their testimony, interns accessed data that had not previously been published. Their findings hit headlines statewide; reports revealed that rural students, students of color, and students graduating from challenged school districts were dramatically disadvantaged by the scholarship program’s structure. Participants will view film clips, work products, and media hits to facilitate discussion.

Takeaways:  Participants will gain 1. Increased knowledge of the relationships between advocacy and scholarship administration (why providers need to engage at the institutional, state, and federal levels to make their dollars effective), 2. Opportunity to explore benefits and risks of student-led engagement in the legislative process, 3. Access to sample documents, clippings, and footage of actual advocacy engagement, and 4. Motivation to do more than one’s limited budget will allow in isolation.

Track: Scholarship Program Basics

Format: Panel - presentation is lead primarily by a group of presenters with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Faith Sandler, The Scholarship Foundation of St. Louis
Faith Sandler is Executive Director of The Scholarship Foundation of St. Louis, an organization comprised of $40 million in assets providing $5 million annually in interest-free loans and grants to 600 low-income students. The organization also offers: advising; paid internships; and, advocacy at the institutional, state, and federal levels. Prior, Sandler worked for the federal court evaluating school desegregation in St. Louis. She is co-founder of a regional college access and success network called St. Louis Graduates, serves on the board of directors of the Dan Broida/Sigma-Aldrich Scholarship Fund, and the Advisory Board of University of Missouri-St. Louis’ Nonprofit Management and Leadership Program. Recent recognition of Faith’s work includes: St. Louis County NAACP’s Inspiring St. Louisan award, National College Access Network’s Executive Leadership Award of Excellence, MONEY Hero for Missouri by Money Magazine, and an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Dan Parris, Speak Up Productions
Dan Parris is an award-winning filmmaker and owner of Speak Up Productions, a St. Louis based film production company. He’s directed the feature length documentaries When the Saints, Show Me Democracy, and the award-winning film, What Matters?. His projects have given him the humbling opportunity to speak to thousands about the issue of extreme poverty and the ability young people have to make a difference. Dan was awarded Biola University's 2012 Distinguished Young Alumni of the Year Award for his work in film and activism and was the closing speaker at the 2014 TEDxGatewayArch City 2.0 event. Most recently, Dan co-founded the non-profit, Continuity, with the mission to expand diversity in media production.

Karissa Anderson, The Scholarship Foundation of St. Louis
Karissa Anderson is Manager of Advocacy and Policy Research with The Scholarship Foundation of St. Louis and St. Louis Graduates. An Education Policy Intern from 2013-2015, she now manages the education policy intern program and is designing and building a state-wide coalition of students advocating for equity in higher education (#ActiveAdvocacy). Karissa graduated May 2015 with a Masters in Social Work from Saint Louis University and from Southeast Missouri State University in 2012 with a Bachelor’s of Science in Communication. Karissa has made presentations to: National College Access Network national conference; Brown School of Social Work at Washington University; and, Cambio de Colores (an academic conference on Latinos in the Heartland). Karissa sits on the Community Advisory Board and Policy Advisory board of the Deaconess Foundation. She has testified before numerous commissions and legislative bodies, and has authored a number of editorial pieces.

Karina Arang, Ritenour School District
Karina Arango is a teaching assistant in the Welcome Center (for very recent immigrants) and English Language Learner classrooms in the Ritenour School District in St. Louis County. In 2015, she completed her bachelor’s degree in communications at Fontbonne University, where she was awarded by the President for her advocacy work and the only undergraduate hooded for her service. Karina was an apprentice at the Missouri History Museum, organizing and publicizing weekly events through the Bracero Program. She plans to attend graduate school to pursue her interest in issues affecting undocumented students, as well as helping students navigate college admissions and financial aid.

Robert Elam, The Scholarship Foundation of St. Louis
Robert Elam accepted roles as Education Policy Intern and Student Advisor with The Scholarship Foundation of St. Louis in 2014. Before joining the Foundation, he worked at St. Louis County Human Services as a Youth Services Specialist. An active community volunteer, Robert spends his spare time providing guidance in life planning, employment, and postsecondary education to young people. Robert attended the University of Missouri-St. Louis, where he earned a Bachelor of Social Work, and completed his MSW in 2016.

Amber Overton, East St. Louis Public Schools
Amber Overton has recently accepted a position as School Social Worker with East St. Louis Public Schools. In that role, she works to provide guidance and advising to young people transitioning out of high school. She also provides management support to St. Louis Graduates High School to College Center, a summer drop-in site for students encountering challenges in the summer after high school graduation. Amber is a graduate of Saint Louis University with bachelors’ degrees in Social Work and Psychology and a 2015 graduate of the Brown School of Social Work at Washington University with a specialization in Urban Education. As 2016 Senior Education Policy Intern, Amber researched merit-based financial aid and how to make merit programs more equitable.

6.3 - Opportunities for Change for Community Foundations
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 1:15pm-2:30pm

Description: Are your community foundation scholarships inspired or tired? In this session participants will be led through a series of questions to challenge existing scholarship program design with an eye towards improvement and incorporation of best practices.  Part presentation, part group discussion, learn from your peers and leave with specific steps to re-examine your community foundation scholarship practices.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. participate in a critical exploration of program design, 2. learn about best practices from peers, 3. identify steps to re-examine your scholarship practices.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture and small groups

Presenter(s):

Kim Stezala, Stezala Consulting, LLC
Kimberly Stezala is President of Stezala Consulting, LLC, a company that assists scholarship providers, foundations and educational organizations to improve their vitality through objective analysis and consulting. Kim is focused on the strategy, evaluation, and improvement of programs with the overall goal of strengthening outcomes for youth and families in the college pipeline.

Students and parents know Kim as The Scholarship Lady,® through www.scholarshiplady.com and her book Scholarships 101: The Real-World Guide to Getting Cash for College.

She has been a guest speaker for the National Scholarship Providers Association for 10 years and was the content development consultant for the NSPA’s online toolkit for scholarship providers.

6.4 - The Heart of It: Allowing Donor Participation in the Scholarship Process
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 1:15pm-2:30pm

Description: Scholarship providers often work with donors who desire a connection with the recipients of scholarships they fund, and want to be part of the selection process. This is not as simple as it used to be—ten years ago, Congress significantly curtailed, and in some cases prohibited, this practice. Yet we still await guidance from the IRS, clarifying which scholarship funds are affected and how to comply. This session, devoted to scholarship providers that are 501(c)(3) public charities and permit donor participation in the selection process, will examine the fundamentals of the current law; how the law applies to the many variations of donor-advised scholarship funds; and the perils of noncompliance.

Takeaways:  Participants will leave with a 1. Clearer understanding of the IRS limits of donor participation in the selection process by public charity scholarship providers, 2. Perspective on how those limits apply to their programs; and 3. Reminder of the risks of noncompliance with those limits and potential opportunities for structuring around them.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Karen Leaffer, Leaffer Law Group
Karen Leaffer is a recognized leader in the area of nonprofit law, and a frequent presenter at the National Scholarship Providers Association’s Annual Conference. She practiced in some of Denver’s largest, most respected law firms for more than 20 years before forming Leaffer Law Group, a firm whose sole focus is to advance, guide and support the work of nonprofit organizations. She is also a community leader, a mentor and an entrepreneur. It is her extensive experience, combined with her lifelong dedication to serving nonprofits, which makes her a sought-after resource for nonprofit organizations and their advisers.

Karen serves as both general and special counsel to nonprofits, advising them on corporate, tax and transactional matters, including the regulation of private foundations, supporting organizations and donor-advised funds, and the award of scholarships, prizes and other special types of grants.

Karen currently serves as managing editor and contributing author of A Guide for Colorado Nonprofit Organizations, a role she has served since the Guide’s inception in 2007. She also served as a contributing author of the National Scholarship Providers Association’s Scholarship Program Toolkit. Karen has a Martindale-Hubbell AV Preeminent® ranking, and has been recognized in Best Lawyers in America® for Non-Profit/Charities Law (2007-2016), and for Tax Law (2015) and in Law Week Colorado as the Barrister’s Best Nonprofit Attorney (2011, 2013, 2015). In 2014, she received the Denver Business Journal’s Outstanding Women in Business award in the law category.

6.5 - Connecting Students to Financial Resources through Scholarship Central
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 1:15pm-2:30pm

Description: Connecting to private financial resources can be a complex process that favors students who know how to navigate the system. Through Scholarship Central, St. Louis has created a free community resource to level the field so that low-income students have access to financial resources. An online system using a common application, Scholarship Central connects students to more than 70 local and regional scholarship and interest-free loans programs. Over four years, $15 million has been awarded through Scholarship Central. This session will provide an overview of the creation of Scholarship Central and tips for other communities considering a similar resource.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. learn about how various organizations collaborate to provide this student-focused service, 2. see a live demonstration of the system, and 3. hear about lessons learned over the past five years.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Breakout Session - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Amy Basore Murphy, St. Louis Community Foundation
Amy Murphy is co-creator of Scholarship Central and serves on its oversight committee. She is director of scholarships and donor services at the St. Louis Community Foundation and serves on the Steering Committee of St. Louis Graduates. With forty years in college and nonprofit management, Amy enjoys bringing new people and businesses to the scholarship table to help remove financial barriers from college access and completion. Amy has an MA from Washington University.

Ellen Vietor, St. Louis Graduates
Ellen Vietor manages Scholarship Central. She is responsible for the technical aspects of the system, supporting scholarship providers and applicants, recruiting new providers and marketing Scholarship Central to referral sources and students. Prior to joining St. Louis Graduates, Ellen spent many years in sales and marketing with both nonprofit and private sector organizations. She earned her MBA at Saint Louis University.

6.7 - Key Non-discrimination Principles and Actionable Strategies for Institutions of Higher Education and Private Scholarship Providers
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 1:15pm-5:15pm (30 minutes break)

Description: The use of scholarships and financial aid in higher education is a dynamic field, with federal, state, and national conversations increasingly focused on the cost of college and students’ ability to pay. Most colleges and universities use scholarships to reinforce their unique mission and goals, including those related to access, diversity, and inclusion. But, when awards are made with some consideration of certain factors (e.g., race, ethnicity, gender, or sexual orientation), different federal laws can be triggered. It is essential, therefore, that institutions and scholarship providers understand these requirements so that scholarships can be awarded in an effective, legally sustainable way that achieves institutional goals.

Very few recent court and federal agency decisions have focused specifically on scholarships. The entire universe of U.S. Supreme Court case law involving challenges to race-conscious enrollment practices – and virtually all lower federal court decisions – focus instead on the admission process. As a result, some may be unaware that general rules applicable to admission extend to financial aid and scholarship decisions as well.

This engagement is intended to inform institutions and scholarship providers on the federal legal and policy framework and provide recommended strategies for meeting legal obligations and broader institutional goals.

Takeaways:  Attendees will receive a copy of the accompanying manual, A Federal Legal and Policy Primer on Scholarships Key Non-discrimination Principles and Actionable Strategies for Institutions of Higher Education and Private Scholarship Providers, developed by Art Coleman and Terri Taylor of EducationCounsel and supported by the NSPA and The College Board.

Track: Scholarship Program Basics

Format: Workshop - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Art Coleman, EducationCounsel
With extensive background in providing legal, policy, strategic planning, and advocacy services to educators throughout the country, Mr. Coleman addresses issues of access, accountability, and completion in elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education.

Mr. Coleman is a 1984 honors graduate of Duke University School of Law and a 1981 Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Virginia. Mr. Coleman served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights from June 1997 until January 2000, following his tenure as Senior Policy Advisor to the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights. He has testified before the U.S. Senate and the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights; he has served as an adjunct professor at two law schools and at one graduate school of education; and he has spoken widely and published extensively regarding legal and policy issues in education. He is a current member of GLSEN’s Board of Directors and the Lab School of Washington's Board of Trustees. He is a past Chairperson of the Board of Directors for the Institute for Higher Education Policy. Mr. Coleman leads the legal and policy work of the College Board's Access and Diversity Collaborative, and was a principal author of the brief filed by the College Board and other education organizations in the pending U.S. Supreme Court case, Fisher v. University of Texas.

Terri Taylor, EducationCounsel
Terri Taylor's portfolio focuses on projects related to access and diversity in higher education on behalf of the College Board’s Access & Diversity Collaborative, the Association of American Medical Colleges, and leading institutions of higher education, among others. She also works on issues related to quality and accountability in higher education, new models for delivering quality instruction to K-12 students, data and privacy, state assessment transitions, competency-based learning, and educator effectiveness. Ms. Taylor earned her B.A. from the University of Virginia, with distinction, and her J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Before law school, she taught English to migrant students in Virginia and to 7-12 grade students in the Kyrgyz Republic as a Peace Corps Volunteer.

7.1 - Becoming an Effective Meeting Facilitator
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 3pm-5pm

Description: It isn’t easy getting a group engaged, motivated, and to consensus in order to take the necessary action that will support an organization’s efforts. With the right fundamentals, process and practice, facilitation skills can be developed for any professional or consultant. In this workshop, you will learn the basics of facilitation in order to assist organizations, teams and communities to agree on decisions, projects and initiatives. Participants will gain information on how to structure meetings in order to create engagement and build consensus. Strategies will be discussed to help prepare agendas, determine activities and exercises, and managing difficult situations.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. learn 5 key preparation steps for planning for facilitation, 2. gain tips in developing agendas, 3. learn basic methodologies and facilitation formats to engage groups and build consensus, 4. learn tips, strategies and activities to get create participant engagement, 5. understand best practices of managing group conversations, and 6. gain strategies in how to manage disruptions and difficult situations.

Track: Professional Development

Format: Workshop - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

K.J McCorry, Officiency, Inc.
K.J. McCorry is the owner of Officiency Enterprises, Inc., a consulting company based out of Boulder, CO. K.J. consults in a wide-variety of topics including productivity, systems improvement, records management, and sustainability. She is the author of Organize Your Work Day In No Time, by Que Publishing. She has appeared in The New York Times, International Herald Tribune, Chicago Tribune, Real Simple, CNN Money, and Better Homes & Gardens, as well as regular TV and radio appearances. K.J. has been nominated twice by her peers for the prestigious Founders Award with the National Association of Professional Organizing, recognizing leaders who have furthered the productivity industry. She was also selected as a finalist for the 2008 Oppenheimer Funds Entrepreneur of the Year Award, who recognizes entrepreneurs who have successfully built businesses and positively impacted the community. She currently resides in Boulder, CO.

7.2 - Add On With Add-Ins: Data Management and Analysis for Scholarship Providers
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 3pm-5pm

Description: Data management is a critical element in scholarship programs having the ability to demonstrate their results and tell their story. Excel Add-Ins are easy solutions that greatly facilitate data management efficiency. Add-Ins automate frequently used tasks. Instead of having to write macros, the add-ins are VBA files that contain coding that increases Excel functionality. The workshop will workshop will review how to install Add-Ins and explore three product solutions. These include AbleBits, ASAP Utilities, and Add-Ins.com. Attendees will learn many program capabilities such as how to easily merge Excel worksheets, quickly format data, and do basic statistical analysis. This presentation introduces products that will be of great use to scholarship program researchers.

Takeaways:  Participants will learn of software programs that will facilitate their ability to efficiently manage their data on their scholarship programs.

Track: Professional Development

Format: Workshop - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Barry Nagle, UNCF
Barry Nagle is the Gates Millennium Scholars Program/UNCF Senior Research Associate. Dr. Nagle has worked in the research and evaluation field for the 18 years and completed Educational Research Methodology graduate work at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro and earned his doctorate at The George Washington University in Educational Administration and Policy Studies. He has conducted 21 national and international research and evaluation projects and over 100 regional and local research and evaluation projects. Dr. Nagle also serves on the Association for Institutional Research’s Tech Tip team which provides information to IR officers in the field.

7.3 - Achieving Impact Beyond the Scholarship
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 3pm-5pm

Description: Join us to learn how to leverage your scholarship dollars to increase impact in your priority areas through activities such as targeting specific populations, piloting new programs, and leveraging existing institutional resources. Panelists from two community colleges and a funder will provide several examples that can be adapted to your needs. Our experience includes leveraging scholarships to: 1. increase participation in a new retention program for men of color, 2. pilot a program to require financial coaching of scholarship recipients, 3. increase available retention resources offered by a state prison, and 4. pilot monthly disbursement model for distributing scholarships.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. learn scholarship design example/template for providers to use to allow piloting of initiatives, 2. learn IHE examples of pilot programs/leveraging to increase institutional goals, and 3. learn top considerations for IHEs in choosing populations/pilot programs to target with scholarship funds.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Workshop - Panel - presentation is lead primarily by a group of presenters with some audience participation., Small Groups - audience participation focusing on a central theme or topic. Presenter plays a role of a facilitator.

Presenter(s):

Jenny Achilles, TG
Jenny Achilles has served as program officer at TG, where she has coordinated the organization’s scholarship program since May 2013. Previously, she served as a study abroad advisor at the University of Texas at Austin, with a focus on Latin America. She has master’s degrees in journalism and public policy, with a focus on nonprofit studies, from the University of Texas at Austin.

Victoria Thomas, Houston Community College
Victoria Thomas is a Financial Coach with HCC working to ensure that students increase the likelihood of academic success and graduation by advocating responsible financial behaviors and connecting them with resources and opportunities to enrich their quality of life. Before joining HCC, she worked for JP Morgan Chase and entities spanning nonprofit, government, and healthcare sectors. Passionate about empowering others to find their own way to their goals, she volunteers as a financial literacy educator for the Women’s Resource Group of Greater Houston and actively supports the We are Girls initiatives. Victoria holds an MBA and is currently pursuing an advanced degree in Education Entrepreneurship from the University of Pennsylvania.

Bill McMullen, Tarrant County College, Trinity River Campus
Bill McMullen serves as the director of Student Financial Aid Services at Tarrant County College Trinity River Campus in Texas with 20 years of experience in financial aid. Bill is a Veteran of The U.S. Air Force with 10 years of active duty. He served in Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm with the Flying Tigers. Bill started in Financial Aid as a Veteran Affairs Work Study and held several positions within financial aid, including as front counter staff, College Work Study coordinator, loan coordinator, Veteran Certify Official, and associate director. Bill serves as staff sponsor of the Veterans Organization, Guitar Club, and Martial Arts Club.

7.4 - Maximizing Postsecondary Success Through Strategic Partnerships
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 3pm-5pm

Description: Scholarship providers and other community-based organizations often consider community partnerships to increase student and organizational outcomes. However, identifying partnerships that will be the most impactful can be challenging and managing partnerships requires staff time and resources that could be allocated towards direct student services. This workshop will present a model used by Meritus College Fund to engage and evaluate new and existing partnerships, as we seek to grow organizational capacity, minimize duplication of efforts, and increase student services and outcomes. Workshop participants will receive hands-on training on how to apply the matrix and other tools to their setting, work in small groups to establish best strategies, and develop an active list of prospective partnerships that can help advance their respective organization’s mission, student outcomes, and community impact.

Takeaways:  Participants will 1. practice using an evaluation tool for identifying partnerships that complement their organizations’ missions and 2. strengthen how to approach and prioritize partnerships based on student and organizational needs collectively and holistically.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Workshop - Small Groups - audience participation focusing on a central theme or topic. Presenter plays a role of a facilitator.

Presenter(s):

Mario De Anda, Meritus College Fund
Mario De Anda joined Meritus as Program Director in 2016. Mr. De Anda is a Deeper Learning Equity Fellow who has previously worked with East Palo Alto’s Foundation for a College Education, Big Picture Learning, and the Hispanic Scholarship Fund. He received his BA in Economics and Psychology from the University of Notre Dame and a certificate in nonprofit management from San Francisco State University. Mr. De Anda is the son of Mexican immigrants and was born and raised in El Paso, Texas. He is deeply committed to expanding college access and completion for first-generation and low-income students.

Nicolas Rosa, Meritus College Fund
Nicolas Rosa joined Meritus in 2014 with primary responsibilities in managing Scholar outreach and selection, supporting Scholars in their academic and professional pursuits, and coordinating scholarship, counseling, and career program efforts. Prior to joining the Meritus team, Mr. Rosa founded FirstGen, a college campus based organization focused on assisting first generation college students as they work towards graduation. Mr. Rosa also worked with college-bound students as an Admission Fellow for Pitzer College where he interviewed student applicants, gave informational presentations on college admission and financial aid policies, and assisted in the selection of the first year class. Mr. Rosa holds a B.A. with Honors in Psychology and English & World Literature from Pitzer College and grew up in Las Vegas, NV. Mr. Rosa is a first generation college student who loves live music, a good book, blogging, and the occasional reality show every now and then.

Grace Fowler, Meritus College Fund
Grace Fowler joined Meritus in 2015 as the College Success Advisor. Prior to joining the Meritus team, Ms. Fowler served two terms with AmeriCorps in the Twin Cities, Minnesota at College Possible, a college access and success non-profit. While there, she supported and advised first-generation juniors and seniors in high school through the college preparation and application process. Ms. Fowler holds a B.A. in Educational Studies and English from Macalester College. She is a native of Brooklyn, NY and enjoys crossword puzzles, cooking, and British TV shows.

7.5 - How to Develop and Implement Effective Communications Plans for Any Scholarship Program
Tuesday, 10.11.16 - 3pm-5pm

Description: Do your current communications efforts help accomplish your goals? Or do they fall short? Do you even have a communications plan in place? If you lack a strategic communications plan, don’t worry. You’re not alone. According to a survey by NonProfitMarketingGuide.com, 70 percent of nonprofits describe their strategic communications plan in one way or another as non-existent.

No matter the size of your organization, it’s critical for scholarship programs to develop and implement a strategic, efficient communications plan. Workshop participants will learn how to implement a simple, proven methodology to ensure your communications efforts build your brand—your reputation—and share your message with the right audience at the right time without wasting time or money.

Takeaways:  Participants will learn to: 1. objectively evaluate your starting point, 2. define your desired outcomes, relevant stakeholders and target audiences, 3. make the most of your marketing and communication budget—no matter the size, 4. identify your strengths and weaknesses —then learn to leverage them, and 5. develop your own marketing and communications plan.

Track: Scholarship Program Enhancements and Advanced Topics

Format: Workshop - Lecture - presentation is lead primarily by the presenter with some audience participation.

Presenter(s):

Angie Austin Gaskill, Relativity Consulting Group
Angie Austin Gaskill is an experienced communications and marketing consultant with 20 years of experience in corporate and non-profit positioning, branding, integrated marketing communication, and content marketing strategy including media relations and social media.

Before returning Relativity Consulting Group, the consulting practice she launched in 1999, Angie was a senior vice president at Weber Shandwick, a global communications agency. There, she led client engagements with non-profits and Fortune 50 companies creating and executing strategic plans to engage audiences and help them achieve their business goals.

Angie’s previous experience also includes her role as senior vice president

Thank you to the following organizations for their generous support!

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